CHICAGO: LINCOLN PARK HOME WALK (part 2)

1879 N. BURLING STREET, LINCOLN PARK

Continue north on N. Burling Street (from W. Willow Street) and 1879 is on your right. I have a special affinity for this house because I’m a sucker for tall ceilings, bright patches of color and concrete block. I love the simple, modern style and wood accents. A quick online search shows that it sold for only $657,000 in 1994 while Homes.com now values it at $2,757,400.

1879 North Burling Street Lincoln Park

1917 N. BURLING STREET, LINCOLN PARK

Keep walking up a few houses. 1917 N. Burling Street is interesting because it didn’t look like this six months ago: it got a total makeover! That flashy exterior belies a much older interior. You can see the former infrastructure through the new if you look closely. Homes.com values it at $1,603,900.

1917 West Burling Street Lincoln Park

1932 N. BURLING STREET, LINCOLN PARK

Not even a block down, on your left, is this little place (inspired by the Rodin Museum in Paris). It’s not for me. I mean, exercise some restraint, people.

1932 West Burling Street Lincoln Park

If you look across the street from 1932 you can see where the owners of that manse tacked-on an addition (the red brick doesn’t quite match) the same time that 1932 was under construction. A case of keeping up with the Joneses? The owners replaced the city sidewalk with their own custom sidewalk — I wonder if it’s heated?

Also across from 1932 is 1955 N. Burling Street, which is listed as “Chicago’s Most Expensive Home” and, as of May 8, 2014, is on the market for $18.75 million. It is not Chicago’s most expensive home, it’s Chicago’s most expensive home on the market.

1970 N. BURLING STREET, LINCOLN PARK

Just a few doors down, 1970 N. Burling Street is a one-of-a-kind gem with a story. The blue sculpture, Chevron by the famed artist John Henry, has been removed from the property. I hope it found a good home — it would look fabulous on the grounds of Denmark’s Louisiana Museum.
1970 West Burling Street Lincoln Park

Someone more knowledgeable in architecture than I has explained this property to me, and the details and thoughtfulness that gone into it will likely escape the casual observer. But don’t take my word for it.

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